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Situation Summary

Please note the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health will be updating their data processing systems beginning Friday, July 3rd, so there will not be any updated data reported by them this weekend. While we will not be able to update the data in our existing charts, we will be rolling out new charts this weekend so please don’t wait until Monday to see what is new. Please mask up!

Los Angeles County – Thursday, July 2nd

Today, Los Angeles County had 2,160 more new confirmed cases than the total reported from yesterday. This is up over 9% from the the day before and it is the sixth highest single day increase. The cumulative positivity rate in the county (excluding Long Beach and Pasadena) from 100,188 persons tested positive out of 1,133,140 persons tested is 8.8%.

New hospitalizations increased more than a third over yesterday from eighty-nine to one hundred and nineteen. New deaths increased from thirty-three to fifty-two. Inside the hospitals, the current number of COVID-19 patients increased 2.3% from 1,893 to 1,937. The number of positive tested patients currently being treated in the ICU also increased by the same 2.3% from 530 to 542. There are 1,092 ICU beds reported to be available. The number of patients on ventilators increased by two to 332.

There was a new record setting weekly high of 14,479 new confirmed cases last week, an increase of 39.7% over the prior week and previous record high of 10,379 new cases. During last week, new hospitalizations increased 10.5% over the previous week from 391 to 432. The total new deaths during last week went down another 13.1% from the previous week from 213 to 185.

There were an average of 1,607 patients in hospital care last week, up 16% from the previous week’s average of 1386. There were an average of 422 patients in Intensive Care Units (up 3.6% from 407 the previous week) and an average of 292 patients on ventilators (down 5.8% from 310 the previous week).

Los Angeles County continues to lead California’s counties with the most number of COVID-19 confirmed cases and deaths by a huge margin with over 37% of the state’s confirmed cases and over 46% of its deaths over the past two weeks. The number of daily new confirmed cases is now unmistakably on the rise from the range where it had been roughly plateaued at the end of April/beginning of May.

Chart of new Confirmed Cases, Hospitalizations and Deaths (columns) for L.A. County as a whole. Trendlines (dotted lines) are seven day moving averages. Read more…

The jagged green line here charts the number of new confirmed cases for each day. The dotted green line shows us the seven day moving average trend for these new cases. There is a visibly evident rise in the dotted green line since the end of May when it broke out of its rough plateau averaging within the range of 800 to 1,000 new cases per day.

The light blue line charts the number of new hospitalizations for each day and the dotted dark blue line is its seven day moving average trend line. The latter clearly shows a decrease of more than half over the past month. The dotted red line shows the seven day moving average trend for the pale orange columns of the new COVID-19 deaths that occur each day. There is a slight decline in this trend line when considered since the end of April.

Chart of current hospitalizations (solid orange line) along with patient counts in the ICU (Intensive Care Units) and on ventilators (light and dark orange columns). New hospitalizations and deaths (dashed lines) are also shown. All dotted lines are three day moving average trend lines. Read more…

The orange line along the top of the chart shows the number of cases currently hospitalized. This shows a gradual decrease of more than fifteen percent over the course of May. This line appears to be ascending now for the past week and a half. The columns show the numbers of these patients in the ICU (Intensive Care Unit, orange) and on ventilators (dark orange). The seven day moving average trend lines for these show gradual declines over the course of May but have since roughly plateaued in June.

Chart of (cumulative) Tests, and Confirmed Cases, New Tests (column) for Los Angeles County. Trendline (dotted line) is a seven day moving average of New Tests. Read more.

The light blue columns indicate the approximate number of new tests that have been reported for each day. There is a lot of volatility shown from day to day but the seven day moving average trend shown by the dotted blue line clearly displays a major increase in testing with a current level roughly three times greater than what it was just three weeks ago. The light orange columns show the new confirmed cases each day. The seven day moving average trend for these (shown by the dotted red line) has been relatively flat for several weeks despite all the recent test increases. Similarly, the pale pink line of cumulative confirmed cases has been increasing steadily but not commensurate with the rapidly increasing testing shown by the light blue line.

There is a separate Situation Summary for the beach cities of South Bay Los Angeles specifically covering those cities.


see more…

See all the charts for Los Angeles County showing Testing, Confirmed Cases, Hospitalizations and Deaths for the county as a whole.

More charts showing demographics distributions by Age Group, Underlying Conditions, Ethnicity, Income and Gender for Los Angeles County as a whole.

See charts specific to the beach cities of South Bay Los Angeles showing Confirmed Cases, Hospitalizations, Deaths and Testing.

How is Los Angeles County doing relative to New York City? See the comparison charts between Los Angeles County and New York City.


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